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Low-cost ops help drive small-sats launch market towards $62bn by 2030

Posted 14 May 2018 · Add Comment

The evolution of small satellites from technology demonstrators to providers of low-cost operational services across distributed industry segments is attracting launch demand from organisations all over the world, according to industry analysts Frost & Sullivan.



By 2030, there will be an estimated 11,631 launch demands for new constellation installations and replacement missions, which could take the market past the $62 billion mark. As the lifespan of these satellites is between two years and five years, there will be constant launch demand and participants will look to enhance their systems and infrastructure.

"While North American and European companies will be the leading developers of flexible, dedicated launch vehicles, players in Asia-Pacific are looking to follow suit," said Vivek Suresh Prasad, Space Industry Principal, Aerospace & Defense. "Many players are also analysing the feasibility of the small-satellite spaceport business model to provide dedicated launch services to small-satellite operators."

Frost & Sullivan's recent analysis, Small-satellite Launch Services Market, Quarterly Update Q1 2018, Forecast to 2030, studies the demand for small-satellite launch based on operators' maturity, mass classes, and user segments. It forecasts the number of small satellites, payload mass, and launch revenue based on defined scenarios.

The high volume of launch demand for small satellites is driving satellite operators to increase their launch capacity. The current rideshare capacity is insufficient to meet the upcoming launch demand.  Most small satellites use the rideshare capacity as a secondary payload on existing launches. This makes their project schedule and mission requirements dependent on the primary payload. Many incumbent and emerging commercial operators are preparing for the impending capacity expansion by providing dedicated services and launch flexibility to small-satellite operators.

Once the unit shipment needs are met, the market could grow impressively. Some key numbers are outlined below:

    The total projected launch capacity supply, including the success of multiple dedicated planned launch services, is 11,640 small satellites.
    In this case, a total payload mass of 2,473 tonnes can be potentially launched.
    Small satellites in the mass segments of 0 to 15 Kg and 150 to 500 Kg could account for as much as 65% of the small-satellite launch demand.
    32 small-satellite commercial operators will generate more than 90% of the launch demand.

Overall, significant market opportunities will be created by high-volume subsystem demand, dedicated launch services for small satellites, capacity expansion of ground station services, and standard platforms for downstream services.

"The key to resolving production challenges is to standardise, optimise and deploy low-rate serial production lines for small satellites and the launch hardware for the relevant launch vehicles," noted Vivek.

Small-satellite Launch Services Market, Quarterly Update Q1 2018, Forecast to 2030 is part of Frost & Sullivan's global Space Growth Partnership Service programme.

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