in Space

Airbus wins next study contract for Martian Sample Fetch Rover

Posted 16 June 2020 · Add Comment

Airbus Defence and Space has won the next phase of the study contract (Advanced B2) from the European Space Agency (ESA) for the advanced Sample Fetch Rover which will be used to collect samples from the surface of Mars.



Above: Sample Fetch Rover transfer module.
Courtesy Airbus / Copyright NASA JPL CALTECH


Mars Sample Return is a joint NASA and ESA campaign to return samples from the Red Planet. NASA’s 2020 Mars rover mission Perseverance will collect Martian soils and rock samples and leave them on the surface in small metal tubes.

In 2026 NASA will launch an ESA rover to Mars to collect these tubes. Landing in 2028, the rover will then travel an average of 200 metres a day, over a period of six months to find and pick up the samples. It will collect up to 36 tubes, carry them back to the lander and place them in a Mars Ascent Vehicle which will launch them into orbit around Mars. Another spacecraft developed by ESA (with a Nasa payload), the Earth Return Orbiter (ERO), will collect the samples from Martian orbit and return them to Earth.

Airbus in Stevenage is leading the Sample Fetch Rover project, following the completion of the ESA ExoMars rover which is now due to launch in the summer of 2022. The initial phase A and subsequent B1 studies for the Sample Fetch Rover have been underway at Airbus in Stevenage since July 2018.

Sophisticated algorithms for spotting the sample tubes on the Martian surface have already been developed by the industrial team led by Airbus, and a dedicated robotic arm with a grasping unit to pick up the tubes is being designed with a pool of European industries.

The accommodation on the NASA lander and the MSR surface mission profile impose new requirements to the SFR locomotion system, which will be equipped with four wheels, larger than the six flexible wheels used on the ExoMars Rover. Type, size and number of wheels has been chosen to better cope with the selected landing site terrain and with the speed and performance required to reach the depot location and return the samples in due time to the lander.

Unlike the ExoMars rover Rosalind Franklin, which has six wheels, the Sample Fetch Rover will only have four wheels. This is in order to save mass and complexity – but it also presents challenges as the rover has to move more quickly than ExoMars and yet not get stuck on its journey across the surface. The Sample Fetch Rover is required to travel more than 15km across the Red Planet searching and collect up to 36 of the 43 sample tubes left by the Perseverance rover. The samples are due to land back on Earth in 2031.

The latest approval for the Mars Sample Return campaign was given by ESA at its Ministerial meeting in November 2019.

 

 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

UK Space Agency backs Covid-19 testing kit drone deliveries

Drones delivering Covid-19 test kits and a mobile app that uses space-derived data to identify and support vulnerable or elderly people who may be suffering from poverty or loneliness, are among the projects that have been backed by new

Resilient Pilot partners with Aviation Insider

Airline simulator and training specialists, Aviation Insider, have selected Resilient Pilot to provide their free pilot mentoring service.

NP Aerospace opens new Canadian facility

Coventry based armour provider, NP Aerospace, has opened a new facility in London, Ontario, Canada and appointed a General Manager to drive future business growth.

London City Airport resumes flights through Government’s ‘Travel Corridors’

International flights have resumed today from London’s most central airport, as the Government’s ‘Travel Corridors’ policy comes into effect.

Hardide Coatings appoints Rob Holmes as VP Aerospace

Advanced surface coating technology company, Bicester based Hardide Coatings, has appointed Rob Holmes as VP Aerospace as the company targets strategic growth in the aerospace and defence sectors.

Aerospace fuel expert celebrates centenary with student lecture

Dr Eric Goodger, a Cranfield University lecturer for many years following his career as a Cranfield academic, will celebrate his 100th birthday this week with a lecture on his favourite topic, fuels and combustion.

Getac SK0707210720
See us at
DVD 2020