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BAE Systems launches Hunter Class prototyping phase bid process

Posted 25 June 2019 · Add Comment

BAE Systems Australia is today launching the process to bid for work on the Hunter Class Frigate Programme’s prototyping phase.



Above: The Hunter Class Frigate based on BAE Systems' Type 26 Global Combat Ship design.
Courtesy BAE Systems

Australian businesses that supply equipment and services, from scaffolding and pipes to deck coverings and insulation, will today learn how to secure an estimated $20 million in contracts through the Hunter Class Frigate Programme, providing local jobs and developing the country's defence industry capabilities to establish an enduring naval shipbuilding sector in Australia.

More than 150 businesses from around Australia will converge in Adelaide for a procurement update that launches the process to bid for work during the Hunter programme’s prototyping phase, which commences next year.
 
Starting in December 2020, five ship blocks will be built at the Osborne Naval Shipyard, in South Australia.
 
During this phase Australian businesses that supply minor equipment, materials and services can bid for an estimated $20 million in contracts across two specific supplier categories.
 
In one of those categories, known as 'category D', the Hunter programme is committed to achieving 100% Australian suppliers.
 
The prototyping phase is a crucial stage in the programme where all the processes, systems, tools, facilities and workforce competencies will be tested and refined before construction on the first frigate commences in 2022.
 
The $35 billion Hunter programme will deliver nine state-of the-art anti-submarine warfare frigates to the Royal Australian Navy and is the biggest surface ship project in Australia’s defence history.

Managing Director ASC Shipbuilding, Craig Lockhart said: “The Hunter programme is committed to maximising opportunities for Australian suppliers through supply contracts and initiatives to nurture and grow small-to-medium sized businesses.
 
“Today’s procurement update is not a just an information session – this is a genuine opportunity for our team to help Australian businesses bid for upcoming contracts to supply equipment and materials for the prototyping blocks, like scaffolding, pipes, steel, deck coverings, cables and insulation, as well as services, like outfitting and painting.
 
“By maximising opportunities for local suppliers through contracts for supply and initiatives to nurture and grow small-to-medium sized businesses, we are raising the Australian defence industry’s ability to compete for and win domestic and international maritime work.
 
“That’s one of our strategies and commitments to building a world-class, sovereign capability for continuous naval shipbuilding for this country.”

 

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