in Aerospace

Controlled airspace approved for Farnborough

Posted 12 July 2018 · Add Comment

An airspace change proposal by TAG Farnborough Airport has been largely approved by the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).


Courtesy TAG Farnborough

The Airport’s request for the introduction of Class D airspace in its surrounding area will be met - subject to some significant concessions to the general aviation community.
 
The CAA said that given the increase in business aviation at Farnborough Airport, there was a material safety case for introducing controlled airspace around the airport, to create a known traffic environment.
 
However, to accommodate the needs of other airspace users, two airspace blocks to the southwest and south of the airport will be classified as Class E, not Class D. These blocks will be notified as ‘Transponder Mandatory Zones’ (TMZ), allowing access for aircraft without the need for air traffic control clearance - providing they are equipped with a transponder. Radio equipped aircraft that lack a serviceable transponder may still be able to access these blocks through local arrangement with Farnborough air traffic control. ADS-B devices will be accepted once considered fully interoperable with ground-based safety systems. 
 
Farnborough will also be required to collaborate on reasonable access arrangements for gliders in three further Class D airspace blocks in the vicinity of RAF Odiham and Lasham Airfield.
 
Commenting on the decision, Jon Round, Head of Airspace at the CAA, said: “This has been a long and complicated application and we respect the concerns of some sections of the GA community who have opposed it. However, we believe there is a very real safety case for creating a known traffic environment in the vicinity of Farnborough Airport to protect all airspace users.”
 
The CAA said that the new airspace, which will become operational in 2019, is the minimum necessary to contain the international requirements for new performance-based navigation flight procedures being introduced at Farnborough Airport.
 
Following today’s decision, the CAA reaffirmed its commitment to the safe, fair and equitable use of UK airspace. Where the establishment of controlled airspace is necessary for aviation safety – access for private pilots will always be taken into account and in some cases, such as this, the development of new lost cost, high tech conspicuity devices will support this.

 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

AAD2018: Air BP tech services to support African aviation growth

International aviation fuel products and services supplier, Air BP, returns to Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD2018) at Waterkloof Air Force Base in Pretoria, South Africa, this week, using the event to share how its technical

Qatari Typhoon and Hawk export deal takes off

Qatarís deal to buy 24 Typhoon jets and nine Hawks is now officially effective after BAE Systems received its first payment yesterday.

Net successfully snares space debris

The RemoveDEBRIS satellite has successfully used its on-board net technology in orbit, marking the first demonstration in human history of active debris removal (ADR) technology.

Steve Griffiths appointed Stansted Airport COO

Steve Griffiths, most recently Chief Operating Officer for the London Underground at Transport for London and previously Chief Operating Officer for Virgin Atlantic Airways, has been appointed Chief Operating Officer (COO) of

JFD and US Navy unveil Shadow Nav

JFD has partnered with the United States (US) Navyís Naval Surface Warfare Centre Ė Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) in the development of an advanced combat diver navigation module, Shadow Nav, bringing a hands-free underwater

ICAO calls for applications to YAPP

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is calling for applications to the 2019 Young Aviation Professionals Programme (YAPP).

RUBB_SK_1906190119
See us at
DVD18BT3105200918SMIFAVSBT151118Aviation Africa 2019AdvancedEngin BT1406011118SMI GMSCBT3005081118