in Features

Data collaboration for MRO

Posted 1 November 2017 · Add Comment

Mark Martin, Director, Operator Edition Product Line, Aviation & Defence Business Unit, IFS, tells us why sharing is caring in the aviation industry.

The big data generation is upon the commercial aviation industry. According to a 2016 Oliver Wyman MRO Survey , the global fleet of commercial aircraft could generate a massive 98 million terabytes of data per year by 2026.

Between the big aviation players – the OEMs, the airlines and the maintenance, repair & overhaul (MRO) operators - there is a ton of interest not just in gathering data, but sharing it for a number of different benefits, such as predictive maintenance or health monitoring systems.

Data sharing
Some of the leading players in the industry are starting to work on their own data platforms to get in on the benefits of sharing engineering data. GE’s cloud-based Predix platform allows third party MRO operators to download predictive analytical data via the internet, store it within their own systems and share it with customers.



Airbus launched its own cloud-based data platform, Skywise, in June which collects data such as work orders, spares consumption and flight schedules from multiple sources across the industry for MRO operators to perform predictive and preventative maintenance. So far, early adopters include easyJet, Air Asia, Emirates and Delta Airlines, all of which are using the platform for predictive maintenance.

Like Airbus, many airlines and MROs will have several different customers, partners, locations and, in most cases, use different programmes for each one, which leads to data being siloed and sharing programmes being more internally focused.

Speaking at a recent MRO Europe panel, David Longridge, VP services sales for Boeing, said data collaboration between organisations is a key priority in today’s aviation landscape.

“Collaborating with data will bring more mutual benefits for airlines and MROs, but how to do this effectively between the parties is the real challenge,” said David. “No airline wants 50 different applications to look at its aircraft - ideally they’d like to use one or two.”

Collaboration at work - China Airlines

China Airlines is one of the largest airline operators in Asia and, much like Emirates in the Middle East, provide MRO services for many of the airlines they codeshare with.

Aviation safety is a top priority for the airline and it considers the quality assurance of maintenance work as the best foundation for this. Since setting up the Engineering Maintenance Optimisation (EMO) unit in 1959, the company has become a key player in the MRO sector. Currently, China Airlines helps support over 40 domestic and international airlines with over 2,300 maintenance engineers working in five different hangars across Asia, North America and Europe.

The airline’s EMO department found its legacy IT systems were hampering its safety efforts, unable to keep up with changing maintenance and safety requirements happening in the industry.

Houng Wang, responsible for engineering activities at China Airlines, said “Our network of legacy mainframe systems often could not deliver the data insights we felt were critical if we wanted to evolve the business and intro¬duce new efficiencies.

"For the most part, these systems were siloed from each other, and operated by their own set of processes for capturing and storing data. This made it very difficult to access and share timely mainte¬nance information across the organisation.”

China Airlines chose to implement an MRO solution that could help optimise data sharing across the airline and its subsidiaries. Real-time management of line and heavy maintenance events as well as data capture at the point of maintenance was a significant benefit to growth areas of the business - especially in expanding third-party MRO services for the airline’s customers, such as Continental Airlines, FedEx, Korean Air and Japan Airlines.

In addition to reducing operating costs by $3.5 million, better data collaboration helped China Airlines significantly decrease its aircraft layover due to more efficient scheduled and unscheduled line maintenance, meaning aircraft spend more time in the air and less time in the hangar.

A clearer picture
The benefits of data sharing are plain to see. Better visibility into what’s happening at both the company and industry-wide level puts organisations in full control of maintenance, giving them a clearer picture of what’s happening around them to help collaboration with other industry players and benefiting from mutual efficiencies.

The gains aren’t just for airlines but for passengers too, as better vision into data will help increase aircraft availability, increase safety and provide a chance to shift cost savings onto passengers.


 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

Serco acquires Sapienza

Serco Group plc has entered into an agreement to acquire Sapienza Group, from TP Group plc, to expand its offering to the European space sector.

Menzies Aviation renews Air Canada contract at Heathrow

Menzies Aviation today announced it has renewed a significant ground services contract with Air Canada at Heathrow Airport (LHR) and won new business at Copenhagen Airport (CPH).

Views sought to boost security of UK data centres and cloud services

Looking to strengthen security and resilience of UK’s data infrastructure to protect against outages and national security threats, the Government has announced it is seeking views on how to boost the security and resilience of

UK Government to host AFF22 onboard HMS Prince of Wales in New York

On 28th-29th September, the UK Government will host the Atlantic Future Forum (AFF22) on the aircraft carrier HMS Prince of Wales in New York, bringing together senior politicians, policymakers, military leaders, academia, business

Stay ahead of the airplane

Neil Ballinger, head of EMEA at EU Automation, looks at ways of stepping up to the challenges currently facing aerospace supply chains.

Airbus launches UK ZEDC

Airbus is strengthening its presence in the UK with the launch of a Zero Emission Development Centre (ZEDC) for hydrogen technologies, to be based in Filton, Bristol.

ODU SK0105310522
See us at
Future Armoured Vehicles Weapon Systems BTDVD BT2704220922Advanced Engin BT2504031122Future Arm Vehicles Power Systems BTFuture Arm Vehicles Active Protection Systems BT