in Aerospace / Defence / Security / Space

Inmarsat ORCHESTRA hits first milestone in space with LEO satellite

Posted 16 December 2021 · Add Comment

Inmarsat ORCHESTRA achieved its first milestone in space today with the successful activation of a low earth orbit (LEO) satellite payload.



Image courtesy Inmarsat

The LEO satellite is testing new concepts and system configurations for ORCHESTRA’s proposed LEO constellation, which will seamlessly integrate with geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and highly elliptical orbit (HEO) satellites and a terrestrial 5G network, to deliver a uniquely powerful global communications solution for mobility and government customers.  

ORCHESTRA is the first global network of its kind; creating a global, multi-dimensional, dynamic mesh network that will redefine connectivity at scale with the highest capacity for mobility worldwide and at hot spots across the world.  It will deliver the fastest average speeds and the lowest average latency of any network, planned or in existence. 

While details of the in-orbit testing remain confidential, Inmarsat has confirmed that the LEO demonstration satellite payload is testing concepts for LEO-to-ground and LEO-to-GEO communications, which are key steps in delivering the unique capabilities proposed for ORCHESTRA.  As the LEO satellite features a reprogrammable payload, additional concepts will be tested over the coming months.

Rajeev Suri, CEO of Inmarsat, said: “Customers have expressed great excitement about Inmarsat’s  ORCHESTRA network and we are making fast progress to bring that network to reality.  Development of the terrestrial network is proceeding well and we are now moving forward with live tests of ORCHESTRA’s LEO layer.  

“Our vision for ORCHESTRA is a network that uses the right technology for the right purpose.  We are not beholden to a single approach and believe that the best way to meet customer needs is a multidimensional approach that includes GEO, LEO and terrestrial 5G in a dynamic mesh that brings capacity to where it is needed in the most efficient way possible. Today’s announcement is yet another testament to the fact that Inmarsat is a company with commercial momentum and technology leadership.”

Yasrine Ibnyahya, Inmarsat’s Senior Director, Advanced Concepts and Technologies, said: “Our demonstration LEO satellite payload is designed to create new technologies and services that will transform the use of satellite communications by our mobility and government customers worldwide. Using software defined radio payloads in LEO, we are able to test, refine, retest and validate as many concepts as we need. It is a quick, agile and highly economic approach that enables us to meet our ambitious targets for rolling out key components for Inmarsat ORCHESTRA.”

 


 

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